SAGE members presenting at the 2018 Environments for Aging Conference & Expo


D01 - The Annual SAGE Post-Occupancy Evaluation

Room: 105

Sunday, April 22, 2018: 10:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Presented by Migette Kaup, Amy Carpenter, and Robert Soler


The Society for the Advancement of Gerontological Environments (SAGE) has been conducting multidisciplinary post-occupancy evaluations (POEs) since 1999. This year, with the support of a generous sponsor, J+J Flooring, the organization is taking the POE to a higher level and conducting it under official research protocols. This POE will look at how well a specific built environment supports the SAGE principles of safety, holism and well-being, autonomy, enhanced function, relationships, and support of caregivers. Highlighted will be one of the recent Environments for Aging magazine Design Showcase award winners, with an evaluation of its stated goals against the outcomes observed through SAGE research.

Learning Objectives

• Explore an award-winning project at a deeper level to see how well the environment meets design goals. 
• Understand the role that the physical environment has on residents and staff. 
• Identify lessons learned and how they can be applied to your next project. 
• Discover the value of a multidisciplinary look at designed environments.


E11 - Household or Hospitality: Divergent Trends in Senior Living Environments

Room: 102 & 103

Sunday, April 22, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM


Presented by Rob Pfauth +2

In recent years, two approaches to housing and service delivery have come to dominate the market, and have also manifested themselves in correspondingly distinct building typologies. Many providers embracing culture change have tended to prefer small house or household models, while other equally committed sponsors have gravitated toward more hospitality-inspired products. While both approaches are viable, sponsors and designers must be intentional about properly aligning environments, programs, and operations. Join representatives of both schools of thought for a stimulating discussion on the underlying philosophies, relative merits, and appropriateness of each approach, and the diversity of design responses they have spawned.

Learning Objectives

• Understand the differences between house-like and hotel-like approaches to the delivery of housing and care. 
• Appreciate how the two approaches, or variations thereof, might be more or less appropriate for certain categories of elders, depending on their circumstances. 
• Learn how adherents of both schools of thought have structured their functional, operational, and environmental planning processes to optimize alignment with their mission and vision. 
• Discover ways in which various service philosophies, operational models, and physical environments can either create synergy or thwart one another when it comes to delivering effective care.


E13 - Breaking Bad: Resident-Centered Regulatory Improvements

Room: 200 & 201

Sunday, April 22, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Presented by Skip Gregory, Jane Rohde, and Steve Lindsey

The Facility Guidelines Institute has championed the creation of the Guidelines for Design and Construction of Residential Health, Care, and Support Facilities, which provides a resource for the development of person-centered long-term care environments. The Guidelines support innovative change in long-term care settings; foster positive outcomes for residents, families, and staff; and provide an alternative to current licensing codes, currently referenced and/or adopted by numerous states. In this presentation, a designer, a provider, and a former authority having jurisdiction will provide an overview of the revised Guidelines, highlight changes and updates, and share critical information for understanding the importance of the Guidelines to providers, regulators, and designers.

Learning Objectives

• Demonstrate the relevance of the Guidelines from a provider, regulator, and designer perspective. 
• Learn how to implement the resident safety risk assessment as a tool for improving resident and family satisfaction. 
• Demonstrate support for state adoption of the Guidelines. 
• Gain information on the developments of updated regulations that remove barriers to design innovation.


E14 - Innovating from the Inside Out

Room: 203 & 204

Sunday, April 22, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Presented by CC Andrews

A dynamic healthcare landscape coupled with heightened consumer expectations have begun to impact our field, but the end results won’t truly be known for years to come. How do you design environments, programs, and services today that will resonate for tomorrow’s realities? The key is to innovate as an ongoing practice, rather than taking a one-and-done approach. Learn how to weave ongoing, successful innovation into the operational routine by aligning it with organizational purpose. Explore real-world examples of how today’s operators are innovating and crafting viable solutions for their markets and apply lessons learned to innovate in your own.

Learning Objectives

• Learn to leverage organizational purpose into an innovation strategy. 
• Review real-world examples of operators innovating to thrive. 
• Explore how technology is impacting senior living, care models, and design. 
• Identify factors to consider when crafting the right innovations for your organization.


E15 - Multidisciplinary Design: Creating Inspired Senior Living Environments

Room: 104

Sunday, April 22, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Presented by Dean Maddalena and Karla Jackson

As senior living continues to become a multigenerational experience, designers must draw inspiration from other disciplines—especially hospitality and multifamily design. This session will revisit current design directions in these fields and identify how they have been incorporated into senior environments. Presenters will explore upcoming industry trends and discuss the ongoing process of translating design inspiration into the senior living communities of the future.

Learning Objectives

• Identify current design directions across interior design disciplines, especially hospitality and multifamily. 
• Explore the ways in which these trends are incorporated into senior living. 
• Learn how to translate different aspects of design into senior friendly environments. 
• Explore upcoming industry design trends.

 

D02 - When Innovation Faces Regulation: Strategies for Sponsors, Designers, and Authorities Having Jurisdiction

Room: 105

Sunday, April 22, 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM

Presented by Skip Gregory and Lorraine Hiatt


Do you aspire to incorporate innovative features, plan improvements, or technology into your design? Do you serve populations not fully addressed in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)? This session is a deep dive into how evidence-based design, precedents, data, and mock-up studies can make innovation possible. Join us in an animated discussion of how to present design improvements with well-supported information using tools of regulation, including the ADA "equivalent facilitation" clause. Recognize that design innovations are feasible if supported and illustrated with precedents and evidence.


Learning Objectives

• Advance the functional criteria on aging and staffing that has not been adequately addressed. 
• Obtain a clearer idea of how to annotate, support, and present innovations and to justify with data and outcomes, customized to an individual site. 
• Connect with peers with similar interests, increasing the trove of examples and successes using tools.


E16 - The Next Generation of Senior Living: What the Boomer Consumers Really Want

Room: 102 & 103

Sunday, April 22, 3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

By Melissa Pritchard +1 

This team surveyed a broad spectrum of the silent generation and baby boomers across the U.S. to discern the future and learn what they expect of our communities, and what changes in senior living need to be made in order to excite and interest them. Hear the research results and their implications and engage in a lively and interactive discussion using technology that will engage you in the very same questions! Presenters will share case studies of various existing Life Plan Communities that are currently thinking differently to meet the needs of the future generation. This presentation and discussion will conclude with the addition of audience participation, questions, and insights.

Learning Objectives

• Learn what consumers desire for their housing preferences and amenities within a senior community. 
• Participate in a live anonymous participation poll and see what your peers think. 
• Understand how retirement housing will need to be redefined to meet new resident demands while also ensuring successful positioning for your community in the future. 
• Discover the findings and determine the priorities placed on a community’s location, size, wellness and dining options, and other factors.


Room: 203 & 204
Sunday, April 22, 3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

By Jill Schroeder +3

WesleyLife and Pope Architects have worked together to create two innovative senior living communities in central Iowa. The Cottages in Pella, which opened in 2014, promotes resident independence, interaction, and wellness in both its small house design and operational model. This presentation will provide valuable post-occupancy data and important lessons learned through resident outcomes and facility operations at The Cottages. Additionally, the panel will explore how this knowledge, along with new WesleyLife initiatives, are being applied in the design and management of a new community, Brio, a WesleyLife Community for Healthy Living being designed in Johnston.

Learning Objectives

• Understand the key design objectives of The Cottages. 
• Understand the value of post-occupancy reviews of new senior communities and their learnings. 
• Obtain key lessons to apply to the design and operation of new senior communities. 
• Hear about key trends and initiatives in resident-centered care.

Room: 104
Sunday, April 22, 3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

By Rob Simonetti


This session will provide a forum for the Environments for Aging magazine Design Showcase award winners to speak about their projects and the challenges they encountered during the design and construction process. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions about the winning entries, learn about the competition submission process, and gain insight into key elements to include in their own submissions.

Learning Objectives
• Learn about the award-winning construction projects for older adults in both the planning stages and recently completed projects (range of size, scope, cost, and care level offered). 
• Hear about project challenges and learn about architectural and interior design ideas that impact resident quality of life, and the experience for staff and family. 
• Obtain tips for improving the success of a submitted project to the 2018 EFA Design Showcase.

Room: 102 & 103

Monday, April 23, 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

By Siobhan Farvardin Winfrey +1

Villages have always evoked a sense of community, home to all generations, each responsible for provisions that foster the future of the residents. Mixed-use developments propagate the same effect, creating sustainable environments full of vitality. Conversely, senior housing developments have long been isolated sites that sought to provide everything its residents would need within its four walls. And although this all-inclusive concept will still be the right fit for many seniors, there is a growing demand for mixed-use, intergenerational housing that is built into the community. This session will discuss the benefits and complexities of bringing senior housing into mixed-use environments.

Learning Objectives

• Learn key master planning elements for successful mixed-use environments. 
• Understand the benefits of multigenerational communities. 
• Highlight key trends in multifamily and senior housing. 
• View case studies that reinforce the opportunities to integrate senior housing.


E22 - Going WELL in Senior Living: The Views Senior Care of Marion

Room 100 & 101

Monday, April 23, 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

By Gaius Nelson +2

Description

The Views Senior Living of Marion was the first WELL-registered assisted living project in the nation and is designed to the WELL Gold level. Similar to LEED, WELL is a certification awarded by the USGBC. However, the focus of WELL is on creating and maintaining the optimal environment for the occupants of a building. As the first assisted living project to seek WELL certification, challenges were faced with familiarity of the concepts and standards to successfully implement WELL at the design and operational level. This session will discuss the approach to those challenges, lessons learned, and key points to achieving a successful WELL project for senior living.

Learning Objectives

• Understand the pillars, concepts, and precepts of WELL building design. 
• Learn concepts to successfully assemble an effective WELL planning and design team. 
• Understand the challenges of implementing a WELL design project. 
• Understand the benefits versus costs of implementing WELL in the senior living environment.


E23 - Designing Supportive Environments for People with Low Vision: Tools and Techniques

Room 200 & 201

Monday, April 23, 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

By Edward Soenke +2

Description

Members of the National Institute of Building Sciences’ Low Vision Design Committee, which exercises a multidisciplinary approach to empower those with low vision in their quest to lead independent and fulfilled lives, will reprise their presentation from the 2017 Environments for Aging Expo & Conference. Participants will be engaged in a mini charrette to rectify existing conditions and create supportive designs for people with low vision. The team will share basic principles and some evidence-based guidance that designers can employ as they integrate building, interior, and lighting systems into supportive environments for the 17 million Americans who live within the spectrum of low vision.

Learning Objectives

• Discover the basic tools and design rules that can have the greatest effect in supportive visual environments for seniors. 
• Compare proposed standards for designing for low vision populations with general design codes and standards. 
• Learn about lighting design measurements and considerations to help design healthy visual environments for seniors and other low vision populations. 
• Work in a hands-on mini charrette to share and contribute knowledge about designing for low vision.


E25 - Radical Transformation: Turning Tired, Old Product into THE Place to Be!

Room: 104

Monday, April 23, 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

By Amy Carpenter +1


Description

These presenters will take you on a journey of radical transformation. The Elm building was the hardest product for an owner to sell, with occupancy dropping below 30 percent. The design team was challenged to create a sought-after destination and a product that a 20-something would live in. The solution included assisted living and independent living apartments, new MEP systems, food service, and two elevators where there were none before. The Elm was designed and built on a tight timeframe with only three sheets of information about the existing conditions. Hear about the team’s process, see the dramatic before and after images, and leave inspired about possibilities for existing buildings.

Learning Objectives

• See the dramatic before and after images of this design reinvention. 
• Learn about the challenges and benefits of working within existing buildings. 
• Discover how one community is targeting a much hipper client. 
• Explore how you can turn your loss leaders into sales superstars.


D03-2 - A Business Case for Universal Design: The Myth, the Value, the Opportunity

Room: 105

Monday, April 23, 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

By Jane Rohde and Keith Gray

Description

Despite the growing popularity of universal design, execution in practice is challenging. Developers and owners struggle to keep costs low and inevitably meet only minimum requirements for accessibility. While this approach may keep costs in check in the short term, lifecycle costs and the positive human health and wellness benefits are enormous for owners and end users. This session is part two in a two-part deep dive. Presenters will focus on the business case for a revolution in universal design and applications. Participants will learn what opportunities exist to leverage universal design as a differentiator in a competitive market.

Learning Objectives

• Consider the incongruence between the need for universal design and the current state of regulatory standards (accessibility). 
• Reflect on universal design as more than design of the physical environment but a conduit to health and wellness. 
• Discover the potential ROI of a universal design approach. 
• Understand how universal design is a market differentiator you can use to raise the entire field.


E27 - Seniors Outside: Nature and the Environment of Care

Room: 100 & 101

Monday, April 23, 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

By Richard Slayton and Mike McKay +1

Description

Social engagement is critical in environments for aging, and getting out of the house to visit, walk, play, and garden provides purpose and something to do. What if the environment for aging embraced nature and utilized the landscape as an integral part of the environment of care? This team approached the Shepherd at the Range project using the evidence-based design (EBD) process to guide the design and construction. This presentation will take participants on a journey through the process, illustrating how the concept and design came to life, and focused on the inclusion of the landscape as an integral part of the environment.

Learning Objectives

• Review case study factors that support engagement of the landscape as an integral part of the environment of care. 
• Understand the relationship between EBD, biophilia, and biophilic design. 
• Learn how to use elements of landscape design to enhance social engagement. 
• Understand the process of EBD and its application to this project.


E30 - Hospice Design: A Case Study in Designing for the Mind, Body, and Spirit

Room: 104

Monday, April 23, 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

By Stacy Peters +1

Description

This session offers an in-depth case study review of the T. Boone Pickens Hospice and Palliative Care Center. The discussion will begin with a general understanding of hospice care. Then, presenters will explore the five centers of excellence that formed the basis of the design of the project: the Inpatient Care Center; the Spiritual Care Center; the Education, Training and Resource Center; the Child and Family Bereavement Center; and the Outdoor Reflection Center. They’ll share the design solutions for the centers of excellence that were developed with the well-being of patients, families, friends, and caregivers/staff in mind.

Learning Objectives

• Identify the components and parameters of hospice care. 
• Review the five centers of excellence that formed the basis of care and the design project. 
• Explore how the team incorporated design solutions to support the mission of hospice and the centers of excellence. 
• Describe how the design process corresponded to the interdisciplinary team services required in the delivery of hospice care.


E31 - Old Nursing Homes and Person-Centered Goals: Change that Makes the Most Impact

Room: 102 & 103

Monday, April 23, 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

By Migette Kaup 

Description

Old Nursing Homes and Person-Centered Goals: Change that Makes the Most Impact Migette Kaup, PhD, EDAC, NCIDQ, IDEC, ASID, IIDA, Professor, Kansas State University Delivering person-centered care (PCC) in an outdated nursing home provides some unique challenges, and being able to prioritize the necessary changes under budgetary constraints is often a critical factor. This presentation provides examples from 10 case studies of traditionally designed nursing homes participating in a pay-for-performance program linked to PCC in Kansas (PEAK). Comparison between homes at different levels of adoption will demonstrate how resources can be directed to maximize the return of investment. Additionally, research findings from statewide quality of care and satisfaction studies demonstrate that PCC adoption has (statistically significant) positive outcomes, making these investments worth the effort.

Learning Objectives

• Understand the components of PCC practices that have been operationalized for the PEAK program.

• Recognize the contextual variables of the organizational, operational, and environmental practices that may contribute to a more sustainable process for person-centered care.

• Learn more about how the built environment in nursing homes influences the delivery of person-centered practices.

• Distinguish between internal and external assessments and evaluative assessment measures.


E32 - Engaging Art & Photography

Room: 100 & 101

Monday, April 23, 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

By Mitch Elliott +2

Description

Art and photography can contribute to a positive, engaging experience for residents and their families.  This discussion will amply the importance of local, meaningful and indigenous artwork that contributes to the quality of life for residents and their care-giving staff.  Using a case study from rural Nebraska, this dialogue will capture the perspectives of the photographer, the architect and the provider as they share the impact that local art is having on residents and their engagement.  Learn how this approach can translate to meaningful art programs for other unique populations and communities. 

Learning Objectives

• Understand how biophilic research translates into best practices for artwork and art placement in senior environments. 
• Explore how comfort and security begin with familiarity to one’s surroundings. 
• Learn about the physics of aging and how changes in eyesight affect art and design choices. 
• Realize the quality outcomes that can be achieved through meaningful and relatable art and photography.


E33 - Designing Acoustically Friendly Interior Spaces

Room: 200 & 201

Monday, April 23, 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

By LuAnn Thoma-Holec, Keith Stanton, Tabitha Evans +1

Description

This presentation will identify common acoustical deficiencies and the effects they have on residents, show how to utilize design strategies to enhance interiors for residents with hearing impairment, and provide real-time feedback for design professionals to help them identify and neutralize noise pollutants. Presenters will share best practice strategies for designing acoustically friendly spaces, including case study examples of dining rooms, hair salons, life enrichment spaces, wellness, TV lounges, and resident units. They will share the latest acoustical pollution detecting equipment (including using cell phone technology) and how to effectively determine solutions to mitigate resident discomfort.

Learning Objectives

• Identify potential sources of noise pollution in the built environment. 
• Utilize technology to quantify the level of resident discomfort. 
• Learn design strategies to mitigate negative acoustical experiences. 
• Understand common resident hearing impairments and the challenges they pose.


E34 - What’s Next? A Review of New Models and Fresh Ideas

Room: 203 & 204

Monday, April 23, 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

By CC Andrews

Description

The senior living landscape is evolving rapidly. Demographic shifts, consumer preference and new payment models will continue to require significant changes in how we deliver care and services. Current market conditions make it extraordinarily clear that the status quo will not be sustainable.  To effectively create communities that are viable into the future, providers and their design teams need to have new tools in their toolbox. This session will explore strategies for thinking differently to create highly marketable communities and programs. We will review examples large and small of future-focused models in the field and how they capitalize on local market conditions. We will discuss how to meaningfully differentiate from the competition (traditional and otherwise). This session is ideal for operators and design teams. 

 

Learning Objectives

* Identify key financial and market trends impacting the senior living sector 

* Review strategies for innovation and creative problem solving 

* Explore emerging models in senior living and care delivery 

* Learn how to effectively market and differentiate your property from the competition


E38 - Evaluating Housing Models: Results from the Person-Centered Care Benchmarking Survey

Room: 200 & 201

Monday, April 23, 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM

By Maggie Calkins and Addie Abushousheh

Description

Does the built environment make a difference in the quality of care provided or the provision of person-centered care? In the absence of a clear and concise answer, this question can result in a very expensive capital improvement gamble. In 2015-2016, the State of the Art of Person-Centered Care Benchmarking Survey was administered, with more than one-half of the questions designed to inform the relationship between the built environment and the provision of person-centered care. This session will explore specific outcomes relative to three types of

Learning Objectives

• Identify operational and environmental components related to person-centered care. 
• Evaluate the relationship between the environment and other facets of person-centered care provisions. 
• Explore outcomes associated with three different types of care/living area layouts. 
• Consider the advantages and disadvantages of investing in and changing the built environment to advance person-centered care.


E41 - The Casetta: A New Vibrant Living Option for Independent Seniors

Room: 102 & 103

Tuesday, April 24, 8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

By Eric Harrmann +1

Description

How can your community add vibrant and diverse housing options that entice active seniors? The answer is the “casetta,” or small house. Capri Senior Communities wanted to introduce a new product offering for active seniors who are considering entering the senior care spectrum that offers an enriched sense of community. Hear how The Casettas at Village Pointe Commons combine the community appeal of an apartment with the greater independence of a cottage/villa—the best of both worlds. Promoting social engagement, it’s design provides residents more socialization options within their homes while also having access to the community amenities in a truly vibrant housing option.

Learning Objectives

• Understand the basic elements of the “casetta” concept and the design attributes that allow residents to age in place. 
• Explore the design challenges that need to be addressed in order to successfully deliver this concept. 
• Learn how the “casetta” can add a vibrant independent living option to enhance marketability to active seniors. 
• See how the design of common space is used by residents and what daily life is like in the community.


E44 - EFA Remodel Renovation Competition: A Review of 2017

Room: 203 & 204

Tuesday, April 24, 8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

By Andrew Alden


Environments for Aging magazine’s annual Remodel/Renovation Competition, with support from SAGE, sheds light on many little-seen projects with noteworthy aspects to inspire renovation projects, big or small. This presentation will highlight winners as well as other submissions. Attendees will explore renovation ideas for a variety of settings and identify renovation ideas with construction costs ranging from a few hundred to hundreds of thousands of dollars. Attendees will also learn about the competition submission process and key elements to include in program materials.


Learning Objectives

• Learn about renovation projects ranging in size, scope, and cost from a variety of older adult environments. 
• Obtain architectural and interior design ideas that impact resident quality of life and the experience for staff and family. 
• Understand the importance of including operational factors when considering design decisions during a renovation project. 
• Get tips for improving the success of a submitted project to EFA’s 2018 Remodel/Renovation Competition.



E46 - Collaborative Design Thinking: The Co-design Process for Senior Environments

Room: 105

Tuesday, April 24, 8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

By Ruth Neeman and Keith Bradley

Description

The collaborative design process is a technique to manage a multidisciplinary team and harness the creativity of the various stakeholders to achieve an optimal result. This session will explore the connection between the creative mind, problem-solving, and the discipline of using organizational and communication tools, including technology such as building information modeling (BIM). Presenters will use case studies of senior living communities in Massachusetts that have used the collaborative design process, including an “all hands on deck” kick-off charrette.

Learning Objectives

• Understand how the collaborative design process can be used for projects in senior environments. 
• Identify the various disciplines whose input is beneficial throughout the design and development process and how and when to bring them to the table. 
• Appreciate the owner’s role in the design process and learn how to apply personal expertise to promote successful outcomes. 
• Consider how to avoid pitfalls and learn from mistakes (a collaborative process is not “design by committee”).


E49 - Form Follows (Dys)Function: A Critical Appraisal of Best Practices in Long-Term Care

Room: 200 & 201

Tuesday, April 24, 10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

By Addie Abushousheh and Migette Kaup

Description

"Form follows function" is a modernist architecture principle that advocates for the shape of a building to be based on its intended purpose. Too frequently, in the provision of long-term care, it seems as if there would be no function if it weren’t for dysfunction. This session critically appraises taken-for-granted assumptions that have resulted in institutional long-term care settings as well as emerging best practices that are radically changing building design. Special consideration is given to the ways in which both assumptions and practices should be evaluated and translated into providing an optimal setting.

Learning Objectives

• Reveal taken-for-granted assumptions about providing care in long-term environments. 
• Learn about emerging best practices in long-term care design. 
• Evaluate the (mis)alignment between operations and the designed environment. 
• Explore options for basing the design of buildings on the intended function.


E50 - 25 Good Reasons to Come Out of Your Room

Room: 203 & 204

Tuesday, April 24, 10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

By David Dillard +1

Description

All owners, operators, and designers understand the importance of finely designed apartments. But the real magic of living in a senior community is socialization and the myriad moments of laughter, exercise, worship, conversation, debate, and even gossip that mark the difference between joyful longevity and wasting away. Where does this happen? What does it look like? This presentation will scrutinize a plethora of venues as well as proven and creative ways to lure residents out of their rooms and into public spaces, all designed to bring good spirits and good health to residents in all levels of care.

Learning Objectives

• Learn about operational and design adjustments that inspire residents to pursue a richer social life outside of their rooms. 
• Identify ways to modify the design of common areas (interior and exterior) that encourage socialization. 
• Establish the importance of making these adjustments for the well-being of the residents, staff, and residents’ family members. 
• Reinforce the benefits of the active and engaged community through design case studies.


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